Digging DEEP

CAHS students earn college credits



CAHS students Victoria Young, William Norris IV and Noah Vanderhyde earned achievement certificates and college credits for participation in a dual enrollment course sponsored by Davison Schools and the University of Michigan-Flint.

CAHS students Victoria Young, William Norris IV and Noah Vanderhyde earned achievement certificates and college credits for participation in a dual enrollment course sponsored by Davison Schools and the University of Michigan-Flint.

FLINT TWP. — Three Carman- Ainsworth High School students have willingly spent part of their summer vacation still in school.

They elected to enroll in the Environmental Science, Supervised Studies of Environmental Issues course offered by The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-F) as part of the Dual Enrollment Educational Partnership (DEEP) with Davison Schools.

William Norris IV, Noah Vanderhyde and Victoria Young, who will be CAHS eleventh-graders in the fall, earned three college credits in a three-week course that wrapped up last week with a video presentation of their scientific findings. The inaugural DEEP course was taught by two UM-F Earth Sciences professors at the Robert Williams Nature & Historical Learning Center, 10067 Atherton Road in Davison Township, a 102-acre wooded property donated in September 2012 by Robert Williams, chairman of Genova Products.

Davison Schools invited Carman- Ainsworth to participate in the program in recognition of its interest in providing more STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and

Math) opportunities for our students, said Debbie Davis, C-A Data and Technology Coordinator.

Vanderhyde, Norris and Young took the opportunity to earn college credits while learning under the guidance of Randy Repic and Martin Kaufman, both UM-F professors of Earth and Resource Science.

For a reduced tuition rate, the three students tackled college-level course work designed to strengthen their scientific knowledge and problem-solving skills via collecting and analyzing data, making precise measurements and using/constructing maps.

Vanderhyde is interested in a career in biochemistry, Young wants to be a veterinarian and Norris said he is undecided but took the DEEP course to explore his options.

The three spent a lot of their course work immersed waist deep in nearby Kearsley Creek, testing water samples.

Seven Davison High School students also enrolled in the course undertook other projects such as soil testing, doing a ground and aerial survey of the property and incorporating topographical maps.

They were the pioneers for further development of the environmental studies programs with the partnerships between UM-F and Davison Schools, Davis said.

Davison Township leaders in collaboration with Davison Schools are working toward a long-range vision of using the property as a one-of-akind instructional site to model the benefits of sustainable environmental practices.


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