Sloan opens ‘Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition’

Features more than 100 relics from famed ship



One of the most popular features of the tour is the iceberg. Meant to represent the freezing temperatures experienced on the night the Titanic sunk, guests are welcome to places their hands on the ice and hold for as long as possible. Heather Moore, registrar for the Sloan Museum, said it is a misconception most passengers died from drowning — the more common cause was hypothermia.

One of the most popular features of the tour is the iceberg. Meant to represent the freezing temperatures experienced on the night the Titanic sunk, guests are welcome to places their hands on the ice and hold for as long as possible. Heather Moore, registrar for the Sloan Museum, said it is a misconception most passengers died from drowning — the more common cause was hypothermia.

FLINT — For the first time in its history, the Sloan Museum has opened up their anticipated “Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition,” for visitors to take a walk through room replicas and displays of items preserved from aboard the ill-fated vessel.

The exhibition, which had its first showing on Friday, runs through May 21, and comes with a long list of related programs and events for various age groups. Tickets for the exhibit cost $14 for adults, $12 for seniors, $11 for youth and $5 for members, and can be purchased online or in-person from the museum.

Upon entering the exhi- bition, individuals have their picture taken in front of a green screen and pick from a background of the air choosing. Staff then assigns each person the name of a real guest on the Titanic, and the end of the tour reveals whether or not said individual survived the sinking.

To further enhance the authenticity, Flint actors are portraying real passengers in period-accurate garb and speech. Heather Moore, registrar at the Sloan Museum, said each player researched their role, and the museum will always keep one actor wandering through the exhibit.

Among the over 100 featured artifacts, there is a wrench from the Titanic’s engine room used to maintain the ship’s equipment, an exact recreation of a third class room and a large slab of ice to give visitors an idea of how cold the water was on April 14, 1912.

Moore said the museum will sell around 70 tickets for each time slot.

Upcoming events for next month include Iceberg Science, Saturday, Feb. 4, open to ages 7 and up, where attendees are taught facts and hands-on experiments; Enduring Love Dinner, for couples over the age of 18 to share a meal and listen to the love story of Isidor and Ida Straus; and Tragedy and Discovery off the Shipwreck Coast: The Wreck of the Schooner Nelson, on Feb. 16, with guest speaker Bruce Lynn, executive director of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum.

For more information on ticket prices and events, visit sloanlongway.org.


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